2019

Cannes Film Festival Review: Pippa Bianco’s ‘Share’

Share is a feature length adaptation of Pippa Bianco’s 2015 short film of the same name. Waking up on a lawn, a dishevelled Mandy aches from the night before. Evidently, she cannot remember anything. And the mysterious bruises covering her body only add to the enigma. To further the nightmare, a disturbing video involving Mandy and some male schoolmates is circulating her friendship group. After interrogating them, she is left even more confused as to who is lying and who to trust. Spiralling into a frenzy, Mandy recruits her overprotective parents to help her uncover the truth which may cause more harm than it’s worth. In Share, there is nothing exceptional about Rhianne Barreto’s lead performance as Mandy, but she gets the job done.

Given that Share is an extended adaptation, there are sequences that feel overly drawn out, making for a feature that feels way longer than it should be. Even for an 87-minute piece, there are standout sections that could be trimmed. Aside from Barreto, the remainder of the Share cast doesn’t leave a strong impression. The parents eventually morph into one short-tempered organism and become more of a hinderance than anything else. Mandy’s female classmates, whilst supportive, offer little to properly help her. There is always an aura of suspicion when it comes to her male friends, as they clearly are aware of what happened to Mandy on the night in question but are too scared to admit it.

When everything aligns, Share works brilliantly and feels like a true indie hit. Unfortunately, such moments are fleeting, and it ultimately feels like a glorified student film. There is nothing unique or amazing about Share, but it definitely highlights a contemporary anxiety, especially within young adults. Bianco has a great concept, for sure, but the execution is just too weak.

Share is scheduled to release on July 27 in partnership with HBO Films and A24.

Tommy James (TommyJames__) is a film student specialising in publicity and journalism at Falmouth University. Constantly looking for his next film obsession, coming-of-age is his genre of choice. If Tommy was on a game show, Greta Gerwig would be his specialist subject.

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